WRI 2006

Each year, a summary report is generated to document the Annual WRI Meeting in order to best provide direction for WRI's ongoing work to advance the research for HIV+ women. Building on the growing momentum of recent WRI accomplishments, the 2006 meeting focused on two key concepts: first, identifying the most critical constraints to accelerating progress in research and second, focusing our efforts only on those specific constraints within our direct sphere of influence. This approach helped the WRI to zero in on a few key initiatives for the coming year. These initiatives can be broadly described as addressing two basic questions:

  1. What things do we not know that, if known, could significantly impact the course of the epidemic?
  2. What things do we know which, if broadly disseminated, could significantly impact the course of the epidemic?

To accomplish this, the WRI identified initiatives in three areas:

  • Research "policies, practices, and priorities"
  • Clinical Trial Network Accountability
  • Community engagement and leadership development

Attending the meeting were members of the WRI (including representatives from clinical care, HIV research, academia, community-based organizations, government, the pharmaceutical industry and HIV-positive women), guest speakers and invited experts. A list of the 2006 WRI Meeting members, speakers and participants can be found below.

​2006 WRI Meeting Participants

Richard Averitt 
The Well Project
Julie Barroso 
Duke University School of Nursing
Dawn Averitt Bridge 
The Well Project
Gina Brown, MD 
Maternal-Fetal Specialist
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
Rebecca Clark, MD 
LSU HSC
Susan Ellen Cohn, MD, MPH 
Associate Professor of Medicine
University of Rochester
Elizabeth Connick, MD 
Associate Professor of Medicine
University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center
Robert W. Coombs, MD, PhD, FRCPC 
Professor, Laboratory Medicine & Medicine
University of Washington
Terri Creagh, PhD 
Director of Research
Clinical and Epidemiologic Research
Kristy Grimm 
Associate Director, Virology Medical Strategy
Bristol-Myers Squibb
Jane Hitti, MD 
Associate Director
University of Washington Medical Center, Dept. Ob/Gyn
Sally L. Hodder, MD 
University of Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey
Katherine Hollinger, DVM, MPH 
FDA/Office of Women's Health
Rowena Johnston, PhD 
Director, Research
AmfAR – The Foundation for AIDS Research
Ben Kozub 
Boehringer Ingelheim
Sharon Lee 
Director
Family Health Care
Meagan Lyon, MPH 
Senior Research Assistant
Forum for Collaborative HIV Research
Cathy Olufs 
Education Director
The Center for Health Justice (formerly CorrectHELP)
Andrew Pavia, MD 
Professor and Chief, Division of Pediatric
Infectious Disease
University of Utah
Martell Randolph 
Community Educator
AIDS Research Alliance
Claire Rappaport 
Community Liaison
International Network for Strategic Initiative in Global HIV Trials (INSIGHT)
Patricia Reichelderfer 
NIH/NICHD
Wendy Rhein 
Executive Director
The Well Project
Alex Rinehart 
Associate Medical Director
Tibotec Therapeutics
Yolanda Rodriguez-Escobar 
Executive Director
Mujeres Unides Corba el SIDA
Ellie Schoenbaum, MD 
Director of AIDS Research Program
Montefiore Medical Center
Stephen P. Storfer, MD 
Senior Associate Director, Virology
Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Kimberly Struble, PharmD 
Medical Team Leader
Food and Drug Administration, Division of Antiviral Products
Melanie Thompson, MD 
Principal Investigator
AIDS Research Consortium of Atlanta
Fulvia Veronese, PhD 
Chair, HIV/AIDS Etiology and Pathogenesis
Coordinating Committee
NIH, Office of AIDS Research
Ron Wilder 
President
Aligned Action, Inc.
 

 

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