WRI 2019 - Women Living with HIV over the Long Term and Across the Lifespan

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The Women's Research Initiative on HIV/AIDS (WRI) conducted its annual meeting May 2-5, 2019. The WRI 2019 meeting, Women Living with HIV over the Long Term and Across the Lifespan, broadly addressed issues related to long-term experiences with HIV across the lifespan, including those relevant to older women who are aging with HIV and younger women who acquired HIV perinatally or as young children and have now been living with HIV for decades.

The WRI 2019 featured a variety of presentations by experts, which reviewed the most recent science on sex differences related to long-term survival with HIV, investigated what is known and unknown about the psychosocial and structural factors influencing the experiences of women over the long term, discussed the role of resilience in long-term survival with HIV, and investigated quality-of-life indicators for women living with HIV over the long term. The meeting focused on the importance of addressing women's lived experiences across all levels of research, policy, and programming. As with all WRI meetings, WRI 2019 also focused on identifying actions that individual WRI members can take to address gaps in research and care related to the long-term health and well-being of women living with HIV.

 

 

View the 2019 WRI Issue Brief: Women Living with HIV over the Long Term and Across the Lifespan

View photos from the 2019 WRI meeting on our Facebook page

In the context of current policy initiatives to "end the HIV epidemic," focusing on women who have been living with HIV over the long term makes it clear that viral suppression—the endpoint highlighted in these initiatives—is only one important metric of success. Moreover, viral suppression will not be sustained unless other medical, psychological, and social issues affecting the lives of women are addressed. If we hope to truly change the course of the HIV epidemic, it is imperative to attend to the full range of women's lived experiences at all levels of research, policy, and programming.

The WRI identified a number of research, policy, and advocacy gaps that need to be addressed (please see the WRI 2019 issue brief). The WRI is committed to working collectively with all relevant stakeholders, including WRI members to advance these efforts.

2019 WRI meeting participants

Erika Aaron, MSN
Philadelphia Department of Health
Ada Adimora, MD*
UNC School of Medicine
Alison Agwu, MD, ScM
Johns Hopkins
Judith D. Auerbach, PhD*
University of California San Francisco
Dawn Averitt*
Women's Research Initiative on HIV/AIDS
John Brooks, MD
Centers for Disease Control
Gina Brown, MSW
Southern AIDS Coalition
Jennifer Bushen, PharmD
Janssen Scientific Affairs
Cecilia Chung
Transgender Law Center
Jenna Conley*
Women's Research Initiative on HIV/AIDS
Elizabeth Connick, MD
University of Arizona
Judith Currier, MD, MSc
UCLA, David Geffen School of Medicine
Antigone Dempsey
HRSA/HAB
Rebecca Denison
Dazon Dixon Diallo, DHL, MPH
SisterLove, Inc.
Karine Dube, DrPh
UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health
Lisa Fitzpatrick, MD, MPH, MPA
Promoting Practical Health, Inc.
Jennifer Kates, PhD*
Kaiser Family Foundation
Naina Khanna
PWN-USA
Michelle Lopez
ACRIA
Raven Lopez
Caribbean Women's Health Association
Edward Machtinger, MD
University of California San Francisco
Krista Martel*
The Well Project
Tonia Poteat, PhD, PA-C
University of North Carolina
Linda H. Scruggs, MHS
Ribbon Consulting Group
Kathleen Squires, MD
Merck & Co Inc.
L'Orangelis Thomas Negron Phyllis Tien, MD
University of California San Francisco
Vani Vannappagari, PhD, MPH, MBBS
ViiV Healthcare
Fulvia Veronese, PhD*
DAIDS, NIAID, NIH
Celeste Watkins-Hayes, PhD
Northwestern University
Shannon Weber, MSW
UCSF/HIVE, Please PrEPMe.org
Andrea Weddle, MSW
HIV Medicine Association
Charles Wira, PhD
Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth
Julie Womack, PhD
Yale School of Nursing
 

*2019 Advisory Board Member

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Red40something commented on 9 By 49

Wed, 9/15/2021 - 1:51am

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Red40something commented on 9 By 49

Wed, 9/15/2021 - 1:50am

Get basic information about a variety of approaches to treating the metabolic changes that may result from living with HIV or taking HIV drugs.

Lipodystrophy means abnormal fat changes. This article addresses treatments for fat loss, or lipoatrophy.

Get basic information about lipodystrophy: body shape changes, metabolic complications, and causes and treatment of fat loss and fat gain.

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