What You Need to Know: HIV Among Transgender Women and Barriers to Care

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Webinar occurred March 9, 2017

On March 9, in honor of National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NWGHAAD), The Well Project joined forces with partner organization, Positive Women’s Network-USA, to present its 1st webinar in the WATCH! 2017 series, "What You Need to Know: HIV Among Transgender Women and Barriers to Care." The webinar provided an overview of the impact of HIV among trans women, describing barriers to care, highlighting findings from the Positively Trans survey, and discussing successful programs and advocacy actions for participants. Our esteemed speakers included:

  • Tonia Poteat, PhD, PA-C, Johns Hopkins University; Women’s Research Initiative on HIV/AIDS
  • Tiommi Jenae Luckett, communications coordinator, community advisory board, A Girl Like Me, The Well Project; national advisory board, Positively Trans
  • Arianna Lint, community advisory board, Una Chica Como Yo, The Well Project; Arianna’s Center, Translatin@ FL
  • Naina Khanna, executive director PWN-USA; Women’s Research Initiative on HIV/AIDS

This webinar was moderated by:

Webinar Recording and Slides

  • Click here to download the PDF slides presented during the webinar

Certification

The WATCH! 2017 treatment advocacy series will consist of 3-5 webinars throughout the year. The Well Project will issue certificates of completion for each 1.5 hour webinar to participants who attend the live webinar or view recording, and complete the pre- and post-assessment test. The webinars will be recorded for those who are unable to participate live and will be accessible for 1-2 months after they initially take place. If you are accessing the recording of the webinar, you still need to complete the pre-and post-assessments. A final evaluation survey will also be disseminated at the end of the series. 

Additional Resources from The Well Project

A Girl Like Me/Una Chica Como Yo blogs

"I am an African-American Transgender Woman Living with HIV, and sometimes I have to choose which battle to fight… Being Black is no easy feat. I recognize all kinds of systemic privilege at my job, and I do not benefit from any because I am Black. As hard as I work, I feel undervalued and overworked… I face chauvinism and unwanted sexual advances at every turn… So, as I am sitting here thinking about the intersections in my life, it [becomes] apparent how resilient I truly am. I'm well, having the knowledge that I am a conqueror through divine intervention. There are forces working together for my good." ~ Tiommi Jenae Luckett, continue reading… I Could Be Broken, but I'm Not Defeated

"In Peru, before making the transition, I was the victim of much bullying for being a queer person and quite feminine. And the police attacked me. Once I was leaving a nightclub and a policeman stopped me. He took me to a parking lot far away, on the beach, put a gun to my head and sexually abused me. Then he left me on the beach. There were other incidents."  ~ Arianna Lint, continue reading… Real Trans Latina History

Other Additional Resources

Presenter contact information

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